Nuclear power plants and other large nuclear facilities in the United States

Operating or closed.

Including their individual histories, locations, technical details, official contact points, and local activist groups.

There are over 100 operating nuclear power plants in America and 16 non-operational power plants, and a large number of nuclear fuel and weapons facilities. The more you know about these places, the more frightened you’ll be -- and should be!

How can we protect our nuclear power plants?

Don’t count on the plant security forces -- they aren’t nearly strong enough. These plants are each vulnerable to air strikes, truck bombs, boat bombs, and of course, the well-equipped and well-armed single madman or small group of terrorists. All anyone needs to do is toss a grenade into a Spent Fuel Pool and hundreds of thousands or even MILLIONS could die.

WE CAN SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCE OUR VULNERABILITIES BY CLOSING / CONVERTING THE NUKE PLANTS TO NATURAL GAS AND WIND FARMS, ETC..

(That is exactly what they did to Fort St. Vrain in Colorado.) The energy price per kilowatt is much lower than for nuclear or any other energy source. And there’s no “decommissioning” of wind turbines, either.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is a lap-dog agency which does little to protect the public and much to inhibit the replacement of nuclear technology with other, safer energy sources. They will not protect you. In fact, RIGHT NOW they are relicensing many of these reactors for another 20 years each of dangerous operation.

It’s time for a change, America!

This country needs to wise up to the lie that we’ll “freeze in the dark” if we turn off the nukes. There are clean energy solutions which we must adopt.

Sources for this list include the webmaster’s store of NRC files which were downloaded before the NRC revised their web site; NUREG 1437, which the NRC has since reposted; DOE’s 1999 Yucca Mountain Draft Environmental Impact Statement; NO NUKES, by Anna Gyorgy and Friends, 1979, South End Press; The Electric War by Sheldon Novick, Sierra Club Books, 1976; and many other sources including hundreds of articles, company web sites, industry web sites, activist web sites, etc.. Please send suggestions or updated information to: Russell Hoffman, webmaster: rhoffman@animatedsoftware.com

Please visit our Internet Glossary of Nuclear Terminology:

http://www.animatedsoftware.com/hotwords/index.htm

For a giant list of about 200 nuclear-related books, videos, and pamphlets collected by the webmaster of this site:

http://www.animatedsoftware.com/environm/no_nukes/mybooks.htm

REGIONAL INFORMATION (color coded)

LUCKY (AR, LA, IN, OK, WY, RI, ND, MT, AK, HI)

By State: AL AK AR AZ CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI IA

ID IL IN KS KY LA MA MD ME MI MN MO MS MT

NC ND NE NH NJ NM NV NY OH OK OR PA PR

SC SD TN TX UT VA VT WA WI WV WY

A note on Naval Reactors (written by John P. Shannon, November, 2001):

KAPL [Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory] presently has no land based power plants in operation. The last two were shut down as a result of my TV appearance a few weeks ago.

The two available to be restarted, when no one is watching, are located in West Milton, NY, about 25 miles north of Albany, which is the capital of NY, and ten miles west of NY's premier tourist attraction during June, July and August. During this time ten's of thousands of visitors are in town, many of them millionaires.

Naval Nuclear Power Plants are, however, located at Pearl Harbor, HI, Norfolk, VA, Puget Sound, Washington State, Charleston, SC and San Diego, CA.

Many are located at Sea at all times.

I have always thought that sabotage at one of the big Navy Bases would be a disaster, however, the Navy has always considered sabotage to be a non credible scenario and has never taken plans to protect against such an act. We had many arguments on this subject many times at KAPL and most of us [Engineers] were in favor of planning for Sabotage.

The morons who really run the show the so called "...decision makers..." would never pay for the extra engineering effort to protect against the possibility of sabotage at any Naval Reactor Facility, including shipyards.

John P. Shannon, U. S. Marine Corps Major, Former Nuclear Physicist/Nuclear Engineer, Former Supervising Nuclear Physicist/Engineer and Former Manager of Nuclear Safety, Industrial Safety/Industrial Hygiene at Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory.

Here's the URL of Jack Shannon’s web site: http://www.mindspring.com/~kapl/index.html

 

 In the chart below:

AEC = Atomic Energy Commission (The AEC was split into the DOE and the NRC in 1974)

DOE = Department of Energy ( www.doe.gov )

NRC = Nuclear Regulatory Commission ( www.nrc.gov )

CRAC-2 = 1982 government estimates of “worst case” deaths for various reactors. These are highly dated underestimations which nevertheless are still interesting. Updating of the CRAC-2 analysis is not required for plant relicensing, even though the most vulnerable elements at the sites ­ the spent fuel pools and dry storage casks ­ are not included in the CRAC-2 assessment (because they were not expected to be there). For more information about CRAC-2 including a breakdown of the casualty figures, “scaling” notes, and how to order a copy of the full CRAC-2 report, please visit: http://www.mothersalert.org/crac.html . From there you’ll find lots of other radiation web sites.

Type: PWR = Pressurized Water Reactor (All PWRs use steam generators to produce the steam that drives the plant’s turbines. Primary water flows through 4,000 ­ 15,000 tubes, depending on design. These tubes are subject to degradation from corrosion, cracking, fatigue, and wear (Source: ORNL 1999 NPP Analysis, Appendix E-3). Ice-Condenser type PWR plants have smaller and weaker containments than most other reactor types.)

Type: BWR = Boiling Water Reactor (Mark 1: GE single-cycle forced-circulation boiling water reactor)

Mfg: AC = Allis-Chalmers

Mfg: W = Westinghouse

Mfg: GE = General Electric

Mfg: B&W = Babcock & Wilcox

Mfg: CE = Combustion Engineering

Mfg: OPS = Offshore Power Systems (Westinghouse-Tenneco)

ISFSI = Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation. (Also known as Dry Cask Storage, it is extremely dangerous and should not be allowed. The DOE projects that by 2010 82 nuclear plants at 52 sites will have to add approx. 10,000 MTU of Dry Cask Storage. (Source: ORNL 1999 NPP Analysis, Appendix E-3))

Ultimate Heat Sink = Technical term for where the radioactive waste will seep for thousands of years if there’s a meltdown. (The real “ultimate heat sink” and ultimate disposal location for all reactor waste is our biosphere and our bodies.)

 

Location

Plant Name

Net Mw /

TYPE /

MFG

Amount of High-Level Radioactive Waste onsite

on-line

Current Status

CRAC-2 est. casualties and costs

(Note: CRAC-2 values are U.S.  Government 1982 figures.)

Comments

Current Licensee

NRC docket #

Ultimate Heat Sink

Normal circulation flow rate

NEW ENGLAND STATES:

Connecticut:

(The Webmaster was born and raised in Connecticut)

Haddam Neck Pt. (nearest major city: Meridian, CT; 21 miles SSE of Hartford, CT; 25 miles NE of New Haven, CT)

Haddam Neck Plant ("CT Yankee")

590 Mw

PWR / W

 4-loop

All 1,019 used fuel assemblies are in a spent fuel pool located on the plant site ­ over 390 tons.

Commercial operation began Jan. 1st, 1968

CLOSED December, 1996 (ten years early)

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

102,000

Property Damage:

$74.1 Billion

"DECON PREP" Bruce D. Kenyon, Chairman of the Board. Also President, Generation Group, oversees nuclear operations. 5 years in the U. S. Navy Nuclear Power School, Submarine School, U.S.S. Washington, D1G prototype. (Source: Company web site.)

 

1996: Labor Day Weekend: unknowingly displaced water from reactor vessel with nitrogen. “A close call!”  November: contaminated two workers in fuel transfer area.  Mid-1980s: Seal rupture in fuel transfer canal.  If fuel had been in the canal the consequences would have been disastrous. Lifetime: High worker exposure rate, very poor radiological controls.  (Sources: Nukebusters CT Yankee web page.)

CT Yankee Atomic Power Company (NSTAR is a part owner in Pilgrim, CT Yankee & three other plants.  )

Connecticut River

Niantic Bay, Waterford (nearest major city: New Haven, CT; 3 miles WSW of New London, CT)

Millstone Nuclear Power Station Unit 1

652 Mw

BWR / GE

1055 tons stored at the site (as of 1995)

 

Two 12-foot-long spent fuel rods are missing from Unit 1's spent fuel pool

Jan., 2001 - Company plans to increase Unit 3's spent fuel pool capacity from 756 fuel assemblies to 1860 by closer packing

1970

CLOSED July, 1998

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

54,000

Property Damage:

$92 Billion

"DECON PREP" Contact: Nancy Burton, 203-938-3952 http://www.mothballmillstone.org/

Also, contact: Citizens Awareness Network (CAN), 54 Old Turnpike Road, Haddam, CT 06438, 860-345-8431
ctcan@snet.net

Also, contact: Susan Perry-Luxton, Citizens Regulatory Commission, 180 Great Neck Road, Waterford, CT 06385

Also, contact: Mitzi Bowman, Don't Waste Connecticut, 97 Longhill Terrace, New Haven, CT 06515 (203) 389-206.

Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc. (Former owner: Northeast Nuclear Energy Co.) (decommissioning managed by Entergy Nuclear, Inc.)

Long Island Sound

Millstone Nuclear Power Station Unit 2

830­910 Mw

PWR / CE

1975

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

69,000

Property Damage:

$135 Billion

See Unit 1 for contact information.

Sept. 1999: Two NU subsidiaries pled guilty to 25 violations of environmental and nuclear laws and agree to pay $10 million in "fines and contributions". The charges concerned nuclear training and environmental issues at Millstone Station and environmental issues at their Devon Station in the mid-'90s. (Source: DNC Inc.'s  web site.)

1999-2000:  Repeated shutdowns dues to failures of the reactor control-rod drive system, including control rods that came loose and dropped into the reactor.  The plant operator blamed failed insulation and damaged electrical leads. (Source: OC Register)

1997: Millstone 1,2 &3: 0% Capacity factors. (Source: ORNL 1999 NPP Analysis, Appendix E-3)

Aug. 5th, 1993: Leak causes shutdown at Millstone; Aug. 16th, 1991: Eight control rods show delays in emergency shutdown insertion time at Millstone; Apr. 3rd, 1988: Leakage at Millstone (Sources: Greenpeace; Units unknown)

For a list of problems, visit Nukebuster’s web site for Millstone.

Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc. (Former owner: Northeast Nuclear Energy Co.)

Long Island Sound

Millstone Nuclear Power Station Unit 3

1150­1253 Mw

PWR / W

1986

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

91,000

Property Damage:

$174 Billion

Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc. (93.47%), MA Municipal Wholesale Electric Co., Central Vermont Public Service Co. (Former owner: Northeast Nuclear Energy Co.)

Long Island Sound

 

Maine:

Wiscasset (4 miles S of Wiscasset, ME)

Maine Yankee Atomic Yankee Power Plant

860-885 Mw / 2,440 Mwt

PWR/CE

500 tons according to DOE (1995). Includes at least "66 failed fuel assemblies and +/- 200 damaged fuel assemblies" (and other debris) in the spent fuel pool. (May be as much as 900 tons.)  Plans to use ISFSI.

Dec. 1972

CLOSED Dec. 1996 (no buyer could be found -- upkeep too expensive)

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

39,000

Property Damage:

$79 Billion

"DECON PREP"

Contact Raymond Shadis: http://www.necnp.org/

Also, contact: The Davistown Museum, Box 144, Hulls Cove, ME 04664: http://home.acadia.net/cbm/Rad9.html

Also, contact: Friends of the Coast, POB 76, Edgecomb, ME 04556
207-882-7801

Dec. 12th, 1996: Radioactive leak at the Maine Yankee; Aug. 18th, 1996: Officials shutdown the Maine Yankee after discovering that 15 feet of wire was missing from a circuit used to automatically activate a pump in the emergency core-cooling system (Source: Greenpeace.)

Dec., 1996: Electrical power cable separation issues along with numerous design and operational safety issues result in unit being taken offline. 1995-1996: Extended outage due to an estimated 60% of the unit’s 17,000 steam generator tubes showing defects and cracking.  (Source: Nukebusters)

Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company (decommissioning managed by Entergy Nuclear, Inc) (NSTAR is a part owner in Pilgrim, ME Yankee, & three other plants.  )

Back River

 

Massachusetts:

Rowe (nearest major city: Pittsfield, MA; 20 miles NW of Greenfield, MA; 21 miles NE of Pittsfield, MA)

Yankee Nuclear Power Station

185 Mw

PWR/W

139 tons. Plans to use ISFSI. 140,000 curies of radiation in plant components were sent to Barnwell, SC  and elsewhere for dumping, smelting, and compaction. (Source: Nukebusters)

July 1961 (First large-scale reactor in the U.S.)

CLOSED Sept. 1991 (Rowe was closed prematurely due to embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel. (Source: Union of Concerned Scientists.)

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

5,100

Property Damage:

$21 Billion

"DECON" 600MWt

Contact: Citizens Awareness Network, Box 83, Shelburne Falls, MA 01370, 413-339-5781
can@shaysnet.com

For more information about this plant, including information about on-going epidemics in the Deerfield River Valley, visit the nukebusters’ web page on Yankee Rowe.

In addition to the embrittled reactor vessel, stress corrosion cracking was found in the steam generators at the time the reactor was closed. (Source: Nukebusters.)

Yankee Atomic Power Company

Deerfield River (feeds into the CT River in Greenfield, MA)

Plymouth (40 miles S of Boston; 15 miles N of Cape Cod, ; 4 miles SE of Plymouth, MA; near Brockton, MA)

Pilgrim Station: Unit 1

655 Mw

BWR/GE Type: Mark I (a "sister plant" to FitzPatrick and VT Yankee.)

358 tons as of 1995.

2,714 fuel assemblies are in the spent fuel pool as of 1999.

First commercial power: Dec. 9th, 1972

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

56,000

Property Damage:

$82 Billion

Contact: Mary Lampert, Massachusetts Citizens for Safe Energy, Duxbury, MA, and: Citizens Awareness Network / Nuclear Free New England for information about elevated cancer rates around Pilgrim and other related information.

First successful sale of a nuke -- $81 Million, 1999. ("Boston Edison will fully fund the decommissioning trust with $471 million"). (Source: Entergy web site.)

1987-1990: Shut down for extensive repairs costing $500 million.  (Source: Nuclear Free New England web site.)

Dec. 30th, 1988: Reactor shutdown due to failure of control equipment. (Source: Greenpeace.  Note possible conflict with 1987-1990 citation, which might mean repeated shutdowns occurred.)

June 3-11, 1982: Exceptionally high releases of radioactive Cs-137 and other substances, a recurrent problem along with bad fuel, cracked cladding, poor management, mechanical problems, inadequate filtration and monitoring.  (Source: Nuclear Free New England web site.)

Two additional Pilgrim Units were originally ordered

Entergy Nuclear, Inc (NSTAR is a part owner in Pilgrim, Seabrook, ME Yankee, CT Yankee & VT Yankee.  Orig. owner: Boston Edison Company)

Cape Cod Bay

 

New Hampshire:

Seabrook (nearest major city: Lawrence, MA; 13 miles S of Portsmouth, NH)

Seabrook Nuclear Station: Unit 1

1,200 Mw

PWR/W

146 tons as of 1995.

1990

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

40,000

Property Damage:

$163 Billion

Owners:  North Atlantic Energy Corp. (35.98%), United Illuminating, BayCorp Holdings Ltd., MA Municipal Wholesale Electric Co., New England Power Corp., CT Light & Power, Canal Electric Co., NH Electric Coop., Inc., Hudson Light & Power Dept., Taunton Municipal Light Plant

At least one additional Seabrook unit was planned.

Public Service Co. of New Hampshire (NSTAR is a part owner in Pilgrim, Seabrook, & three other plants.)

Atlantic Ocean

 

Vermont:

Vernon (nearest major city: Holyoke, MA; 5 miles S of Brattleboro, VT)

Vermont Yankee Generating Station

540 Mw

BWR/GE Type: Mark I (a "sister plant" to FitzPatrick and Pilgrim Plants.)

425 tons as of 1995.

Released over 300,000 curies into the atmosphere since start up. (Source: Nukebusters)

1972

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

27,000

Property Damage:

$69 Billion

Contacts: VT Citizens Awareness Network, PO Box 920, Putney, VT 05346 Phone: 802-387-4050, 413-339-5781 can@shaysnet.com  www.nukebusters.org

New England Coalition on Nuclear Pollution, PO Box 545, Brattleboro, VT 05302 necnp@necnp.org

Reactor animation: http://www.vermontyankee.com/exploreNuclear.shtml "Vermont Yankee replaced all of the plant's reactor water recirculation piping in 1985 with piping of improved materials to prevent corrosion." The backup power supply system was replaced in 1990, and control room instrumentation was upgraded to digital." VT Yankee Chairman is Robert Young.  (Source: VT Yankee web site.) The CEO is Ross Barkhurst.

NSTAR is a part owner in Pilgrim, Seabrook, ME Yankee, CT Yankee & VT Yankee.

Recent:  Suffers from corrosion cracking.  1998: Anti-terrorism tests breach security repeatedly. 1996: Core shroud fixed with tie rods.  1980s:  Shut for two years. (Sources: Nukebusters.)

Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corp. (13 companies co-own the plant: Central VT Public Service Corp. (31.3%), New England Power Co. (20.0%), Green Mountain Power Co. (17.9%), CT Light & Power Corp. (9.5%). Also: Central ME Power Co., Public Service Co. of NH, Burlington Elec. Dept., Montaup Electric Co., Cambridge Elec. Light Co., Western MA Elec. Co., VT Elec. Coop., Inc. 1.0% Washington Elec. Cooperative, Inc. 0.6% Lyndonville Elec. Dept.)

Connecticut River

 

New York:

Buchanan, Westchester County (nearest major city: White Plains, NY. New York City, the greatest city in the world, is just 24  miles S of Indian Point.)

Indian Point Station: Unit 1

265 Mw

PWR/ B&W

746 tons as of 1995.

 

 

Construction permit: 1955

Operating License: 1962

Commercial Operation: Jan. 1963(?)

CLOSED Oct. 1974 (prematurely closed due to lack of an ECCS (Emergency Core Cooling System)

 

"SAFSTOR" 615 MWt

See Unit 2 for contact information

Mar. 8th, 1972: Radioactive water has to be pumped out of the Indian Point (source: Greenpeace)

Built on an active earthquake fault.  Ran for 12 years on a “provisional” license.  Site failed 5 of 6 1979 NRC rules, however this previous license grandfathered in the next two plants at the site!  (Source: Nukebusters Indian Point web site.)

Consolidated Edison Co. of NY, Inc.

Hudson River

Indian Point Station: Unit 2

PWR/W

Construction permit: 1966

Operating License: 1971

Commercial Operation: 1973

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

200,000

Property Damage:

$274 Billion

Visit CLOSE INDIAN POINT NOWhttp://www.closeindianpoint.org/

Also visit Riverkeeper:

http://www.riverkeeper.org

Also contact: Marilyn Elie, Indian Point Project, 2-A Adrian Court, Cortland Manor, NY 10560.  Also, contact Assemblyman Richard L. Brodsky who wants to see IP closed.

IP2 and IP3 share the same design but “on paper”, IP3 is more than 25% more likely to experience an accident than IP2. (Source: Union of Concerned Scientists, Nuclear Plant Risk Study, 2000)

Dec. 03, 2001: - A majority of Unit 2 control room operators (4 out of 7 crews; 10 individual operators) were unable to properly solve simulated emergencies that, had they been real, would have resulted in reactor damage or the release of radiation into the atmosphere.  (Source: TheJournalNews.com )

Feb., 2000:  Steam generator tube ruptures at Unit 2, contaminating 19,000 gallons of cooling water and releasing radioactive steam into the atmosphere. (Source: OC Register) Plant stays closed for 1 year. (Source: NY Times, Dec. 8th, 2001.)

Nov. 1993: Two original safety valves at IP3 found to be insufficiently rated; in the rush to replace them before an upcoming NRC inspection, engineers install them backwards, blocking both cooling systems and disabling backup generators. (Source: Nukebusters.)

1981 Automatic shutdown after electrical failure at IP  (source: Greenpeace; Unit unknown.)

Jul., 1977: Transformer explosion triggers major blackout & scattered fleeing. (Source: Nukeubusters. Unit unknown.)

Aug., 1972: Defective fuel system at IP2 replaced at cost of $10 million (Source: Nukeubusters.)

For many more incidents: http://www.closeindianpoint.org/history.htm or: http://www.nukebusters.org/html/indian_point.html

Evacuation Zone /KI Zone should be at least 50 miles!

Consolidated Edison Co. of NY, Inc.

Hudson River

Indian Point Station: Unit 3

965 Mw

PWR/W

Construction permit: 1969

Operating License: 1975

Commercial Operation: 1976

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

221,000

Property Damage:

$314 Billion

Entergy Nuclear, Inc. (Purchased from the New York Power Authority Nov. 21st, 2000.)

Hudson River

Scriba (nearest major city: Syracuse, NY; 6 miles NE of Oswego, NY)

Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station: Unit 1

610 Mw

BWR/GE Type: Mark I

972 tons as of 1995 (includes Fitzpatrick’s waste);  planning to use ISFSI.

Dec. 1st, 1969

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

25,800

Property Damage:

$66 Billion

Contacts: New York CAN, Tim Judson, 162 Cambridge St., Syracuse, NY  13210, (315) 422-4924. Also: Syracuse Anti-Nuclear Effort, Simon Morrin, (315) 422-4219. Also: Syracuse Peace Council, 924 Burnet Ave., Syracuse, NY 13203, (315) 472-5478

Late 1990s:  Cracking in the reactor's internals has made NM1 "the worst case of cracking in the nuclear industry" (Union of Concerned Scientists).  Most attention has focused on the core shroud, but other cracked pieces (emergency condensers, main drain line, control rod stub tubes) suggest the problem is pervasive. 1979 - 1996: Systemic mismanagement at NM1 result in ~200 cited violations or nearly 1/month.  1987 ­ 1989: NRC shuts NM1 for over 2 years after NiMo revealed they had covered up huge waste-handling problems at NM1.  For years, the waste building was flooded with 40,000 gallons of primary coolant water; three months prior to that announcement, NM1 dumped 50,000 gallons of coolant directly from the reactor into Lake Ontario. (Sources: Nukebusters Nine Mile Point web site.)

A 15-year construction time and $6.4 billion cost made NM2 the most expensive reactor in the world; some groups estimated the cost at around $8 billion.  Faulty construction work continues to plague the plant. 1991: Electrical system failure in the control room nearly causes a meltdown.  April 1999: A virtually identical event causes a dangerously low coolant level, and the reactor core isolation cooling system (RCIC) malfunctioned.  The RCIC was been declared inoperable on at least three other occasions, including during another emergency shutdown (low water coolant level) on the day the AmerGen deal was announced.  After only 10 years of operation, large cracks were found in NM2's core shroud. (Sources: Nukebusters Nine Mile Point web site.)

 

Constellation Nuclear (formerly owned by Niagara Mohawk Power Corp., New York State Electric & Gas, Rochester Gas and Electric, and Central Hudson Gas & Electric were all part-owners in Nine Mile Point Unit Two until Dec., 2000 when it was sold to Constellation Nuclear.)

 

Lake Ontario

Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station: Unit 2

1,080 Mw

BWR/GE Type: Mark 2

Mar. 11th, 1988

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

47,400

Property Damage:

$134 Billion

See Unit 1 for ownership information.

Lake Ontario

Ontario, Wayne County (20 miles NE of Rochester, NY (nearest major city))

R. E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant

490 Mw

PWR/W

310 tons as of 1995.

1969

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

44,000

Property Damage:

$63 Billion

Longest-running reactor in the U.S. (Source: RG&E web site)

Rochester Gas & Electric. Co.

Lake Ontario

Brookhaven, Wading River (nearest major city: New Haven, CT)

Shoreham Nuclear Power Station

820 Mw

BWR/GE PWR?

None.

May 1989

STOPPED 1992?

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

150,000

Property Damage:

$157 Billion

"Dismantled"

Long Island Lighting Co.

Long Island Sound

Scriba (nearest major city: Syracuse, NY; 8 miles NE of Oswego, NY)

James A Fitzpatrick Nuclear Power Plant

780 Mw

BWR/GE Type: Mark I (a "sister plant" to VT Yankee and Pilgrim Plants.)

Fitzpatrick’s high-level waste is stored at the Nine Mile Point reactor.

1975

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

34,000

Property Damage:

$103 Billion

See Nine Mile Point for contact information.

Jan., 1999: Inadequate maintenance leads to a six-hour hydrogen fire on the roof of the control bldg., forcing a plant shutdown (Source: OC Register)

 

Entergy Nuclear, Inc (Originally owned by: Niagara Mohawk Power Corp., then by New York Power Authority.)

Lake Ontario

West Milton (25 miles N of Albany)

Knoll's Atomic Power Lab / Kesselring Site Operation (KSO) Unit 1

S3G (advanced sub reactor)

DOE plans to emplace approximately 300 “canisters” of naval spent nuclear fuel at Yucca Mountain.  Each canister will contain about 12 to 15 tons of spent nuclear fuel.  (Source: Draft EIS for Yucca Mtn., July 1999, page A-29.) 

1958

CLOSED

 

See Jack Shannon's KAPL web site: http://www.mindspring.com/~kapl/index.html

These are destroyer, carrier, and sub prototype reactors including Trident sub reactor prototypes.  One reactor, known as the Sea Wolf, was dumped off the coast of the United States in the Atlantic Ocean as a disposal method.  This is utterly unconscionable.  (This may have been the S1G Intermediate Sub reactor.)

 DOD/DOE

KAPL / KSO Unit 2

D1G

 

CLOSED

 

 DOD/DOE

KAPL / KSO Unit 3

S7G

 

STOPPED Nov., 2001

 

 DOD/DOE

KAPL / KSO Unit 4

S8G

 

STOPPED Nov., 2001

 

 DOD/DOE

MID-ATLANTIC STATES:

Maryland:

Lusby (nearest major city: Washington, D.C., about 45 miles away; 40 miles S of Annapolis, MD)

Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant: Unit 1

845 Mw

PWR/CE

 706 tons as of 1995; using ISFSI.

Both reactors have 217 fuel assemblies with nearly 11 million fuel pellets. (Source: Company web site.)

1974

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

43,600

Property Damage:

$87 Billion

Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 was the first successfully relicensed nuclear power plant in America. CEG owns Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. (Source: CEG web site.)

Its Dry Casks are extremely vulnerable to airplane strikes.

Charlie Cruse is the Vice President - Nuclear Energy at Calvert Cliffs. Plant web site: www.calvertcliffs.com

Apr., 2002: Largest tornado in Maryland history strikes within two miles of the facility. Workers take pictures; lash down picnic tables. September, 2001: Another "rare" Maryland tornado, packing 180 mph winds, came close to the plant as well. (Source: www.sunspot.net)

Constellation Energy Group

Chesapeake Bay

Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant: Unit 2

845 Mw

PWR/CE

1976

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

43,600

Property Damage:

$92 Billion

Constellation Energy Group

Chesapeake Bay

Doublas Point

Doublas Point Project Nuclear Gen. Sta. #1

1,178 Mw

BWR/GE

 

1985

??????

 

AE is a holding company for, among others, Potomac Electric Power Co.

Allegheny Electric

Doublas Point Project Nuclear Gen. Sta. #2

1,178 Mw

BWR/GE

 

1987

??????

 

Allegheny Electric

 

New Jersey: 

Toms River, Lacey Township (nearest major city: Atlantic City, NJ; 9 miles S of Tom’s River, NJ)

Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant: Unit 1

650 Mw

BWR/GE Type: Mark I

421 tons as of 1995; plans to use ISFSI.

1969

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

46,000

Property Damage:

$80 Billion

Contact: Jersey Shore Nuclear Watch, P.O. Box 3085, Toms River, NJ 08756 (732-830-6565) Edith" gbur1@comcast.net

http://www.jerseyshorenuclearwatch.org

"The first large-scale commercial nuclear power plant in the United States." (Source: Entergy web site.)

Entergy Nuclear, Inc Original owner: Jersey Central Power & Light Co. then General Public Utilities

Barnegat Bay

Salem, Lower Alloways Creek (18 miles S of Wilmington, DE (nearest major city)

Salem Nuclear Generating Sta.: Unit 1

Units 1&2:

1,106 Mw

PWR/W

Each Salem reactor has 193, 12-foot fuel assemblies. There are 53 silver-cadmium-indium control rods per reactor.  The reactor vessels are 44 feet high, with 8 1/2-inch thick walls of carbon steel with a stainless steel liner. (Source: PSE&G web site.)

875 tons as of 1995; includes both Salem and  eek nuclear waste. 

 

 

 

June, 1977

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

210,000

Property Damage:

$135 Billion

Contact: UNPLUG Salem Campaign; 321 Barr Ave., Linwood, NJ 08221; 609-601-8537 or 609-601-8583 (8583: fax, answer machine); ncohen12@comcast.net UNPLUG SALEM WEBSITE:http://www.unplugsalem.org/ ; Frieda A Berryhill frieda302@juno.com

Salem and Hope Creek are built on “Artificial Island”, its real name, because the land was built from dredging the Delaware River (there was no land there to begin with).  There is no rock bottom.  Thousands of “pilings” (stilts) were hammered 75 feet down, and the complex “floats” on this mudpile.  They never heard of “liquefaction”.  A fault which has had 75 earthquakes in the past 200 years runs down the middle of the Delaware River.  (Source: Frieda A. Berryhill.)

PSE&G is a part-owner of Peach Bottom Nuclear Generating Station.

Entergy Nuclear, Inc (46.40%), Public Service Electric & Gas Co. (PSE&G) (46.40%); Atlantic Energy)

Delaware River

1,110,000 GPM

Salem Nuclear Generating Sta.: Unit 2

1979

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

215,000

Property Damage:

$150 Billion

(See Unit 1 for ownership information.)

Delaware River

1,110,000 GPM

Hope Creek Generating Sta.: Unit 1

1,031 Mw

BWR/GE Type: Mark I

Reactor core contains 764, 12 ½-foot fuel assemblies.  There are 185 cross-shaped control rods filled with boron carbide. The reactor vessel is 71 feet high, 7-inches thick with low alloy steel clad in stainless steel and inconel. (Source: PSEG web site.)

 

Dec., 1986

Making waste

 

Built on “Artificial Island” (see Salem).  A second Hope Creek unit was planned.

The cooling towers are 512 feet high.  The “EVAPORATED LOSSES (PLUME)” are 13,600 GPM.  Hope Creek cost $4.5 Billion to build. (Source: PSEG web site.)

Public Service Electric & Gas Co. (PSE&G) (Operator); Owned by: Public Service Enterprise Group, Atlantic Energy

Delaware River

 

 

Pennsylvania:

Peach Bottom Township, Delta, York County, (18 miles S of Lancaster, PA (nearest major city))

Peach Bottom Atomic Power Sta.: Unit 1

40 Mw

HTGR

 

June 1967

CLOSED Nov. 1974

 

"SAFSTOR"

High Temperature Helium-Cooled and Graphite-moderated reactor. "Provided valuable technical and cost data to U.S. utilities for application to larger plants." (Source: Exelon web site.)

Philadelphia Electric Co.

Conowingo Pond/ Susquehanna River

Peach Bottom Atomic Power Sta.: Unit 2 (aka Unit 1)

1093 Mw

BWR /GE Type: Mark I

1,000 tons as of 1995; plans to use ISFSI.

1974

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

154,000

Property Damage:

$119 Billion

Aug., 2000: Instrument valve fails, causing leak of contaminated reactor coolant outside of primary containment and a reactor shutdown.  A similar valve failure and leak of radiation occurred May 28th, 2000, but the valves were not replaced.  (Source: OC Register)

The COO of Exelon is Jack Skolds.  Corbin McNeill is the Co-Chief Executive Officer.

Exelon Corporation . Co-owned by: PSE&G Power, LLC, Delmarva Power & Light Co. and Atlantic City Electric Co. Original owner: Philadelphia Electric Co.)

Conowingo Pond/ Susquehanna River

Peach Bottom Atomic Power Sta.: Unit 3 (aka Unit 2)

1093 Mw

BWR /GE Type: Mark I

1974

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

154,000

Property Damage:

$119 Billion

See Unit 1 for ownership information.

Conowingo Pond/ Susquehanna River

Pottstown, Montgomery County (nearest major city: Reading, PA; 21 miles NW of Philadelphia, PA)

Limerick Generating Sta.: Unit 1

1,143 Mw

BWR /GE

476 tons as of 1995. 

Feb., 1986

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

718,000

Property Damage:

$213 Billion

Hard to miss: "The plant site is punctuated by two natural-draft hyperbolic cooling towers, each 507 feet tall". Original owner: Philadelphia Electric Co. (Source: Exelon web site.)

Exelon Corporation

Schuylkill River

Limerick Generating Sta.: Unit 2

1,143 Mw

BWR /GE

Jan., 1990

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

718,000

Property Damage:

$197 Billion

Exelon Corporation

Schuylkill River

Shippingport (near Pittsburgh, PA; 17 miles W of McCandless, PA)

Shippingport Atomic Power Sta.

72 Mw

PWR/W

 

1957

CLOSED Oct. 1982

 

"Dismantled" (variously described as 60 Mwe, 200 MWt) Builder: Westinghouse/AEC

Duquesne Light Co.

Ohio River

Beaver Valley Power Station: Unit 1

852 Mw

PWR/W

480 tons as of 1995.

1976

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

203,600

Property Damage:

$122 Billion

Morgan K. O'Brien is President and Chief Executive Officer.

Duquesne Light Co.

Ohio River

Beaver Valley Power Station: Unit 2

852 Mw

PWR/W

1987

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

199,000

Property Damage:

$11 Billion

 

Duquesne Light Co.

Ohio River

Middletown, Goldsborough, (10 miles SE of Harrisburg, PA (nearest major city))

Three Mile Island Nuclear Sta.: Unit 1

875 Mw

PWR/ B&W

342 tons as of 1995.

1974

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

118,000

Property Damage:

$102 Billion

In Dec. 1999, General Public Utilities sold TMI-1 to AmerGen, a joint venture of PECO (now Exelon) and British Energy, of Edinburgh, Scotland. Original owner: Metropolitan Edison Co. (Source: Exelon web site.)  See Unit 2.

One paper that covers the TMI plants is The Patriot-News.

Exelon Corporation

Susquehanna River

Three Mile Island Nuclear Sta.: Unit 2

906 Mw

PWR

Dec. 1978

CLOSED March 28th, 1979 -- partial meltdown

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

127,000

Property Damage:

$122 Billion

"SAFSTOR" Crashed plane's target could have been reactor! also, visit Three Mile Island Alert

The gift that keeps on giving: Sept. 27th, 1989: Two workers receive high doses of radiation contamination from accidentally touching a piece of the damaged reactor core at Three Mile Island (Source: Greenpeace.)

Metropolitan Edison Company

Berwick (7 miles NE of Berwick, PA; in Luzerne County; nearest major city: Wilkes-Barre, PA)

Susquehanna Steam Electric Sta.: Unit 1

1,050 Mw

BWR/GE

690 tons as of 1995; plans to use ISFSI.

1982

 

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

142,000

Property Damage:

$143 Billion

Robert G. Byram is the Sr. Vice President, Generation & Chief Nuclear Officer, as well as responsible for environmental management at  PPL Utilities.  He has a Master’s degree in physics from Franklin & Marshall College, PA and a Bachelor’s of Science Degree in Mech. Eng. From Drexel Univ., PA. (Source: PPL web site.)

July 12th, 1993: Control system fails at Susquehanna (Source: Greenpeace; Unit unknown.)

 

Pennsylvania Power & Light Co. (Co-owned by Allegheny Electric Cooperative.)

Susquehanna River

Susquehanna Steam Electric Sta.: Unit 2

1,050 Mw

BWR/GE

1984

 

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

142,000

Property Damage:

$137 Billion

Pennsylvania Power & Light Co. (Co-owned by Allegheny Electric Cooperative.)

Susquehanna River

Saxton

Saxton

3 Mw

PWR

 

Apr. 1962

CLOSED May, 1972

 

"DECON"

 

SOUTHEAST & PUERTO RICO:

Alabama:

Decatur (25 Miles SW of Huntsville, AL; 10 miles NW of Decatur, AL)

Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant: Unit 1

1,065 Mw

BWR/GE Type: Mark I

924 tons as of 1995.

1973

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

63,900

Property Damage:

$67 Billion

Aug. 4th, 1984: Accident due to human error and technical failure at Browns Ferry, 13 workers irradiated; May 22nd, 1981: Reactor at Brown Ferry nuclear power plant shutdown when a leak is discovered in the primary containment building, 38 tonnes of radioactive water spilled. (Sources: Greenpeace; Units unknown.)

Mar. 22nd, 1975: Fire caused by workman checking for air leaks with a candle nearly causes disaster by disabling most safety systems at Browns Ferry nuclear power plant (Sources: Greenpeace; OnEarth Magazine.  Units unknown.)

The 27th Director of the TVA, as of Nov., 2001, is Bill Baxter, a lawyer and former chairman of Knoxville-based Holston Gases Inc.

 

 

Tennessee Valley Authority

Tennessee River

Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant: Unit 2

1,065 Mw

BWR/GE  Type: Mark I

1974

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

63,900

Property Damage:

$69 Billion

Tennessee Valley Authority

Tennessee River

Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Plant: Unit 3

1,065 Mw

BWR/GE Type: Mark I

1975

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

63,900

Property Damage:

$73 Billion

Tennessee Valley Authority

Tennessee River

Dothan, Houston County (18 miles SE of Dothan, AL; nearest major city: Columbus, GA)

Joseph M. Farley Nuclear Plant: Unit 1

829-888 Mw

PWR/W ("3-loop reactor")

708 tons as of 1995.

Dec. 1977

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

26,900

Property Damage:

$52 Billion

See Georgia’s Vogtle plant for activist contact information for this plant. 

Construction began in 1970. "The total cost of the plant was about $1.57 billion." Named for the owner of Alabama Power. (Source: SNO web site.)

Southern Nuclear Operating Co. (Owned by Alabama Power )

Chattahoochee River

Joseph M. Farley Nuclear Plant: Unit 2

820 / 888 Mw W ("3-loop reactor")

July, 1981

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

26,900

Property Damage:

$59 Billion

Southern Nuclear Operating Co. (Owned by Alabama Power )

Chattahoochee River

Scottsboro (near Huntsville, AL)

Bellefonte Nuclear Plant: Unit 1

1,213 Mw

PWR/ B&W

 

1980

??????

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

15,800

Property Damage:

$86 Billion

 

Tennessee Valley Authority

Guntersville Lake

Bellefonte Nuclear Plant: Unit 2

1,213 Mw

PWR/ B&W

 

1981

??????

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

15,800

Property Damage:

$83 Billion

 

Tennessee Valley Authority

Guntersville Lake

 

Arkansas:

Russellville (near London; 6 miles WNW of Russellville, AR)

Arkansas Nuclear One: Unit 1

836 Mw

PWR/ B&W

 708 tons as of 1995; using ISFSI.

            

 

Dec. 1974

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

8,200

Property Damage:

$68 Billion

Entergy's Nuclear Chief Executive Officer is Jerry Yelverton Original owner: Arkansas Power and Light Co.  (Source: Entergy web site.)

Feb., 2000: After being relicensed for 20 years, extensive cracking was found on the control-rod drives and thermocouple nozzles.  (Source: OC Register.) May 11th, 1980: Reactor shutdown after radioactive water causes flooding at Arkansas (Source: Greenpeace; Unit unknown.)

Entergy Nuclear, Inc

Dardanelle Reservoir

Arkansas Nuclear One: Unit 2

858 Mw

PWR/CE

Mar. 1980

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

9,100

Property Damage:

$85 Billion

Entergy Nuclear, Inc

Dardanelle Reservoir

 

Florida:

Florida City (25 miles S of Miami)

Turkey Point Station: Unit 3

693-666 Mw

PWR/W

677 tons as of 1995.

 

1972

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

78,000

Property Damage:

$44 Billion

"63 known species of birds and animals that inhabit the property. Of these, 17 are endangered"  (Source: FP&L web site.)

 

Florida Power and Light Co. (A Progress Energy Company)

Biscayne Bay

Turkey Point Station: Unit 4

693-666 Mw

PWR/W

1973

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

78,000

Property Damage:

$49 Billion

(See Unit 3 for ownership information.)

Biscayne Bay

Red Level (7 miles NW of Crystal River, FL; nearest major city: Gainesville)

Crystal River Plant: Unit 3

825 Mw

PWR/ B&W

308 tons as of 1995.

1977

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

7,500

Property Damage:

$54 Billion

1997: 0% Capacity factor. (Source: ORNL 1999 NPP Analysis, Appendix E-3)

June 21st, 1988: Steam leak at Crystal River (Source: Greenpeace.)

Progress Energy owns 5 nuclear power plants in Florida and the Carolinas.

C.S. "Scotty" Hinnant is the chief nuclear officer for Progress Energy. Dale Young is the site vice president.  (Source: Co. web site.)

Oct. 25th, 2001: Crystal River completes a 26-day refueling cycle. (Source: Co. web site.)

Florida Power and Light Co. (A Progress Energy Company)

Gulf of Mexico

Hutchinson Island (12 miles S.E. of Ft. Pierce; nearest major city: West Palm Beach, FL)

St. Lucie Plant: Unit 1

802 Mw

PWR/CE

662 tons as of 1995.

1976

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

14,000

Property Damage:

$54 Billion

"180 species of birds and animals … inhabit the St. Lucie Plant property... Of these, 36 are endangered or threatened". Turtle walks are held annually.  (Source: FP&L web site.)

Florida Power and Light Co.

Atlantic Ocean

St. Lucie Plant: Unit 2

802 Mw

PWR/CE

1983

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

14,000

Property Damage:

$59 Billion

Florida Power and Light Co. (85.1%); Florida Municipal Power Authority; Orlando Utilities Commission.

Atlantic Ocean

 

Georgia:

Baxley (11 miles N of Baxley, GA; nearest major city: Savannah, Ga)

Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Plant: Unit 1

776 Mw

BWR/GE Type: Mark I

831 tons as of 1995.

Dec. 1975 (1974 according to NUREG 1437)

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

7,700

Property Damage:

$51 Billion

Contact: www.cleanenergy.org

Construction began in 1968; The total cost of the plant was $934 million. Named for the president of Georgia Power from 1963 to 1975.  (Source: SNO web site.)

May 9th, 1992: Technical failure at Hatch; June 10th, 1990: Shutdown due to a fire at Hatch (Source: Greenpeace; Unit unknown.)

Southern Nuclear Operating Co. (Operator); Owned by: Georgia Power (50.1%), Oglethorpe Power Corp.; Municipal Electric Auth. Of GA; Dalton Water & Light Sinking Fund

Altamaha River

Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Plant: Unit 2

784 Mw

BWR/GE Type: Mark I

Sept. 1979 (1978 according to NUREG 1437)

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

7,700

Property Damage:

$56 Billion

(See Unit 1 for ownership information.)

Altamaha River

Waynesboro (26 miles SE of Augusta, GA (nearest major city))

Alvin W. Vogtle, Jr. Plant: Unit 1

1,215 Mw

PWR/W

368 tons as of 1995.

May 1987

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

43,200

Property Damage:

$70 Billion

Contact: www.cleanenergy.org

Oct. 26th, 1991: Incident during refueling at Vogtle (Source: Greenpeace; Unit unknown.)

Southern Nuclear Operating Co.

Savannah River

Alvin W. Vogtle, Jr. Plant: Unit 2

1,215 Mw

PWR/W

May 1989

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

43,200

Property Damage:

$62 Billion

Southern Nuclear Operating Co.

Savannah River

 

Louisiana:

Taft (20 miles W of New Orleans, LA (nearest major city))

Waterford Generating Sta.: Unit 3

1,113 Mw

PWR/CE

278 tons as of 1995.

1985

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

384,000

Property Damage:

$131 Billion

Sept. 21st, 1989: Manual shutdown of "WNP" (Source: Greenpeace. (Correct reactor?))

Original Owner: Louisiana Power & Light Co.

Entergy Nuclear, Inc

Mississippi River

St. Francisville (24 miles NNW of Baton Rouge, LA (nearest major city))

River Bend Station: Unit 1

934 Mw

BWR/GE

193 tons as of 1995.

June, 1986

Making waste

 

Original Owner: Gulf States Utilities Co.

A second River Bend unit was planned. 

Entergy Nuclear, Inc

Mississippi River

 

Mississippi:

Port Gibson (25 miles S of Vicksburg, MS; nearest major city: Jackson, MS)

Grand Gulf Nuclear Station: Unit 1

1,210 Mw

BWR/GE

384 tons as of 1995.

July 1985

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

18,300

Property Damage:

$83 Billion

Owned by System Energy Resources (90%) and South Mississippi Electric Power Association (10%). (Source: Entergy web site.)

Aug. 14th, 1989: Instrumentation and control failure at Grand Gulf  (Source: Greenpeace.)

Original Owner: Mississippi Power & Light Co. A second unit was planned for the site.

Entergy Nuclear, Inc  (Operator); owned by: System Energy Resources, Inc. (90%), South Mississippi Electric Power Assoc.

Mississippi River

 

North Carolina: 

At least 20 nukes were planned for NC

Southport (2 miles N of Southport; near Wilmington)

Brunswick Steam Electric Plant: Unit 1

821 Mw

BWR/GE Type: Mark I

492 tons as of 1995.

 

1976

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

30,100

Property Damage:

$57 Billion

1990s: “Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) has been observed in a number of BWR internal components in domestic and overseas plants for several years.”  (Source: ASME, 2000)

Mar. 19th, 1988: Leaks at Brunswick (Source: Greenpeace; Unit unknown.)

The Brunswick plants are about 18% owned by NCEMPA (ElectriCities of North Carolina, Inc.)

The William Madison Randall Library, University of North Carolina, Wilmington, NC, holds the public documents for the Brunswick plants.

Carolina Power & Light Co., (Operator); Owned by: Progress Energy (81.67%); NC Eastern Municipal Power Agency

Cape Fear River

Brunswick Steam Electric Plant: Unit 2

821 Mw

BWR/GE Type: Mark I

1974

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

30,100

Property Damage:

$54 Billion

(See Unit 1 for ownership information.)

Cape Fear River

Cowans Ford Dam, Huntersville (17 miles N of Charlotte, NC (nearest major city))

Wm. B. McGuire Nuclear Sta.: Unit 1

1,100 Mw

PWR/W

Ice-condenser type plant

786 tons as of 1995.

 

1981

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

59,000

Property Damage:

$106 Billion

Contact: Mary Olson, Nuclear Information and Resource Service, Asheville, N.C. Phone: 828-251-2060 Email: nirs.se@mindspring.com, or Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League, Glendale Springs, NC phone: 336-982-2691, email: bredl@skybest.com

2000: Gov’t study (Sandia National Labs) finds one “dire if unlikely scenario” is more likely for McGuire than for other plants because it was more prone to power losses.  NRC and Duke dispute the findings. (Source: www.charlotteobserver.com )

Starting in 2007, the McGuire plants plan to start using MOX (mixed-oxide fuel), which contains surplus weapons-grade plutonium. (Source: Charlotte News & Observer.)

Tony L. McConnell is President and GM of Nuclear Facilities at McGuire.  He graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from the Univ. of Tulsa, OK in 1971 and began working at Duke Energy’s Oconee plant that year. (Source: Duke Engineering web site.)

Mar. 7th, 1989: Manual shutdown due to technical failure at McGuire (source: Greenpeace; Unit unknown.)

Duke Energy

Lake Norman

Wm. B. McGuire Nuclear Sta.: Unit 2

1,100 Mw

PWR/W

Ice-condenser type plant

1983

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

59,000

Property Damage:

$110 Billion

Duke Energy

Lake Norman

Bonsal, Wake County (20 miles SSW of Raleigh-Durham, NC)

Shearon Harris Plant: Unit 1

900 Mw

PWR/W

549 tons as of 1995.

1987

Damn the torpedoes!

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

48,000

Property Damage:

$69 Billion

The Chairman, President and CEO of Progress Energy is William Cavanaugh, a former Navy officer.  (Source: CP&L web site.)

At least three more Shearon Harris units were planned.

Carolina Power & Light Co. (operator); owner: Progress Energy (83.83%); NC Eastern Municipal Power Agency)

Buckhorn Creek

 

South Carolina:

Hartsville (24 miles NW of Florence, NC; nearest major city: Columbia, SC)

H. B. Robinson S. E. Plant: Unit 2

712 Mw

PWR/W

159 tons as of 1995; using ISFSI.

1970

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

13,000

Property Damage:

$43 Billion

The Senior Vice President and Chief Nuclear Officer for CP&L (current as of Aug., 2000) is Scotty Hinnant.  This plant’s license renewal will occur in the 4th quarter of 2002.

Carolina Power & Light Co. (A Progress Energy Co.)

Lake Robinson

Seneca (30 miles SW of Greenville, SC (nearest major city))

Oconee Nuclear Station: Unit 1

847 Mw

PWR/ B&W

 

 

1200 tons as of 1995; using ISFSI.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1973

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

55,000

Property Damage:

$57 Billion

Nov., 2000 to Apr., 2001: After receiving a 20-year license extension, Unit 1 is found to have 19 cracks in the reactor [at the control rod nozzles]. Radioactive cooling water had been leaking into the containment sump.  In Unit 3, nine leaks were found in Feb., 2001.  Later, in Unit 2, four leaking control-rod nozzles were found.  (Source: OC Register.)  Feb. 18th, 2001: Circumference-type cracks discovered in two nozzles on top of the Unit 3 reactor; a government contractor, Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA, identified 13 other plants with PWRs as being “most susceptible” to such cracks. (Source: Toledo Blade.)  Nov. 23rd, 1991: Leak of 190,000 litres of water from cooling system, reactor shutdown; Nov. 14th, 1989: Fuel rod control system fails at Oconee; June 28th, 1981: 54 workers at the Oconee nuclear power plant contaminated with radioactive water during refueling operations.  (Sources: Greenpeace; Units unknown.)

Duke Energy

Lake Keowee

Oconee Nuclear Station: Unit 2

847 Mw

PWR/ B&W

1973

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

55,000

Property Damage:

$58 Billion

Duke Energy

Lake Keowee

Oconee Nuclear Station: Unit 3

847 Mw

PWR/ B&W

1974

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

55,000

Property Damage:

$58 Billion

Duke Energy

Lake Keowee

Broad River, Parr (nearest major city: Columbia, SC)

Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Sta.: Unit 1

1,000 Mw

PWR/W

247 tons as of 1995.

1982

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

82,000

Property Damage:

$68 Billion

Oct. 7th, 2000: A 29-inch diameter primary coolant pipe, with walls more than 2 inches thick, suffers a crack due to water stress corrosion, creating a leak of radioactive cooling water (crack was later found to be 3/16ths inch in diameter, in a weld).  Crack indications were later found at four more reactor inlets.  Reactor remained offline at least though March, 2001. (Sources: OC Register; SCE&G web site.)

Steve Byrne is vice president of nuclear operations for SCE&G.

A second Unit was planned.

South Carolina Electric & Gas Co. (A SCANA company.) (Also part owned by SC Public Service Authority.)

Lake Monticello

Lake Wylie, York County (6 miles NNW of Rockhill, SC; nearest major city: Charlotte, NC)

Catawba Nuclear Station: Unit 1

1,129 Mw

PWR/W

Ice-condenser type plant

512 tons as of 1995.

1985

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

135,800

Property Damage:

$101 Billion

See McGuire plants (NC) for activist contact information.

Starting in 2007, the Catawba plants plan to start using MOX (mixed-oxide fuel), which contains surplus weapons-grade plutonium. (Source: Charlotte News & Observer.)

Catawba is jointly owned by NC Municipal Power Agency Number 1, NC Elec. Membership Corp., Piedmont Municipal Power Agency, Saluda River Elec. Cooperative Inc, and Duke Power  (Source: Duke Power web site.)

Duke Energy (Operator); owned by: NC Eastern Municipal Power Agency, Duke Energy Corp., Saluda River Electric Corp.

Lake Wylie

Catawba Nuclear Station: Unit 2

1,129 Mw

PWR/W

Ice-condenser type plant

1986

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

135,800

Property Damage:

$94 Billion

Duke Energy (Operator); owned by: NC Eastern Municipal Power Agency; Piedmont Municipal Power Agency

Lake Wylie

Parr

Carolinas-Virginia Tube Reactor (CVTR)

17 Mw

PWR

 

Nov. 1962

CLOSED Jan 1967

 

"DECON" Start may have been 1963. Pressure Tube, Heavy Water Reactor.

 

Savannah River Site (11 miles S of Aiken, SC)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kentucky:

Paducah

Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tennessee:

Daisy (10 miles NE of Chattanooga, TN (nearest major city))

Sequoyah Nuclear Power Plant: Unit 1

1,148 Mw

PWR/W

497 tons as of 1995.

1980

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

94,700

Property Damage:

$97 Billion

Apr. 19th, 1984 Technical failure at Sequoyah causes spillage of radioactive coolant water; Aug 7th, 1981 Reactor at Sequoyah nuclear power plant has to be shutdown for repairs following a radioactive leak . (Sources: Greenpeace; Units unknown)

Shares the same design as the Watts Bar reactor, and has the same owner, but Watts Bar (the newer reactor) is considered to be at least twice as likely to have an accident. (Source: Union of Concerned Scientists, Nuclear Plant Risk Study, 2000)

Tennessee Valley Authority

Chickamauga Lake

Sequoyah Nuclear Power Plant: Unit 2

1,148 Mw

PWR/W

1981

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

94,700

Property Damage:

$99 Billion

Tennessee Valley Authority

Chickamauga Lake

Spring City (10 miles S of Spring City, TN; nearest major city: Chattanooga, TN)

Watts Bar Nuclear Plant: Unit 1

1,177 Mw

PWR/W

 

1996

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

20,000

Property Damage:

$87 Billion

America’s newest reactor, Watts Bar “took almost 23 years to build and cost nearly $8 billion” (Source: Salon.com).

Shares the same design as the Sequoyah reactors, and has the same owner, but Watts Bar (the newer reactor) is considered to be at least twice as likely to have an accident. (Source: Union of Concerned Scientists, Nuclear Plant Risk Study, 2000)

At least one more Watts Bar unit was planned.

Tennessee Valley Authority

Chickamauga Lake

Oak Ridge (1 mile S of Oak Ridge)

Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant

350 Mw

LMFBR/ W

 

Indef.

Not built (yet?)

 

 

Tennessee Valley Authority (Commonwealth Edison, ERDA )

Oak Ridge Y-12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NSF (15 miles S of Johnson City, TN)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Virginia:

Gravel Neck (17 miles NW of Newport News, VA (nearest major city))

Surry Power Station: Unit 1

822 Mw

PWR/W

 727 tons as of 1995; using ISFSI.

 

1972

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

90,000

Property Damage:

$56 Billion

Oct. 12th, 1989: Valve malfunction at Surry; Sept. 26th, 1988: Problems discovered with piping equipment at Surry; Dec. 9th, 1986: Explosion at Surry nuclear power plant, four people killed.  (Sources: Greenpeace; Units unknown.)

Two more Surry units were planned.

 

Virginia Electric and Power Co.

James River

Surry Power Station: Unit 2

822 Mw

PWR/W

1973

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

90,000

Property Damage:

$104 Billion

Virginia Electric and Power Co.

James River

Mineral (40 miles NW of Richmond, VA (nearest major city))

North Anna Power Sta.: Unit 1

907 Mw

PWR/W

627 tons as of 1995; plans to use ISFSI.

 

 

 

 

1978

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

35,800

Property Damage:

$66 Billion

Contact: Larry Rosenthal, president of Concerned Citizens of Louisa County (“A watchdog group that’s opposed nuclear power since North Anna was first proposed.”  (Source: Salon.com))

Jan., 2000: 18-year-old valve leaks radioactive coolant at more than 10 gallons a minute, forcing a reactor shutdown.  (Source: OC Register.)  July 3rd, 1981: Fire at North Anna (Source: Greenpeace; Unit unknown.)

Two more North Anna units were planned. 

Virginia Electric and Power Co.

Lake Anna

North Anna Power Sta.: Unit 2

907 Mw

PWR/W

1980

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

35,800

Property Damage:

$60 Billion

Virginia Electric and Power Co.

Lake Anna

BWXT (5 miles E of Lynchburg)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Puerto Rico:

Arecibo

North Coast Power Plant -- Isolte

583 Mw

PWR/W

 

1981

CANCELLED

 

 

Puerto Rico Water Resources Authority

Rincon

BONUS Demonstration Reactor

72 Mw

BWR

 

Aug. 1964

CLOSED June, 1966

 

"Entombed"

 

Punta Higuera

Boiling Nuclear Superheated Power Sta.

16.5 Mw

BWINS

 

1964

CLOSED 1968

 

"Boiling Water Integral Nuclear Superheat"

 

OHIO RIVER REGION:

Illinois:

Morris (9 miles E of Morris, IL; nearest major city: Joliet, IL)

Dresden Nuclear Power Sta.: Unit 1

200 / 700 MWt

BWR/GE

1714 tons as of 1995; plans to use ISFSI.

July 1960

CLOSED Oct. 1978 (prematurely)

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

15,000

Property Damage:

$24 Billion

"SAFSTOR". First "full-scale, privately-financed" nuke in the U.S. Designated a Nuclear Historic Landmark by the American Nuclear Society -- glowing praise indeed!  (Source: Exelon web site.)

Commonwealth Edison Co.

Kankakee River

Dresden Nuclear Power Sta.: Unit 2

794 Mw

BWR/GE Type: Mark I

June, 1970

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

94,000

Property Damage:

$87 Billion

Former owner: Commonwealth Edison Co.

Oct. 23rd, 1989: Failure of core cooling system at Dresden (Source: Greenpeace; Unit unknown.)

Exelon Corporation

Kankakee River

Dresden Nuclear Power Sta.: Unit 3

794 Mw

BWR/GE Type: Mark I

Nov., 1971

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

94,000

Property Damage:

$90 Billion

Exelon Corporation

Kankakee River

Zion (6 miles NNE of Waukegan, IL (nearest major city); 8 miles S of Kenosha, WI)

Zion Nuclear Plan: Unit 1

1,040 Mw

PWR/W

926 tons as of 1995.

Nov. 1974 / 1973?

CLOSED Feb., 1997

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

186,000

Property Damage:

$146 Billion

Both units are in "SAFSTOR PREP".

"Spring of 1998, both units' generators were converted to synchronous condensers." (Source: Exelon web site.)

The estimated $400 million cost to replace the plant’s steam generators was a key factor in the decision to close the Zion plants. (Source: ORNL 1999 NPP Analysis, Appendix E-3)

Exelon Corporation

Lake Michigan

Zion Nuclear Plan: Unit 2

1,040 Mw

PWR/W

Nov. 1974 / 1973?

CLOSED Nov., 1996

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

186,000

Property Damage:

$146 Billion

Exelon Corporation

Lake Michigan

Cordova (20 miles NE of Moline, IL; nearest major city: Davenport, IA)

Quad-Cities Station: Unit 1

789 Mw

BWR/GE Type: Mark I

895 tons as of 1995.

Feb. 1973

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

55,000

Property Damage:

$65 Billion

Co-owned by: ComEd (license holder) (75%), and MidAmerican Energy Company (25%). (Source: Exelon web site.)

Apr. 27th, 1994: Cracks found in core containment vessel at Quad Cities; July 11th 1974: Radioactive vapour escapes after a valve on the primary circuit ruptures at Quad Cities. (Source: Greenpeace; Units unknown.)

Former Quad Cities owners: Commonwealth Edison Co., Iowa-Illinois Gas & Electric Co.

Exelon Corporation (owner (75%) /operator; also owned by MidAmerican Energy Co.)

Mississippi River

Quad-Cities Station: Unit 2

789 Mw

BWR/GE (see Unit 1 for specifics)

Mar. 1973

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

55,000

Property Damage:

$65 Billion

(See Unit 1 for ownership information.)

Mississippi River

Seneca (11 miles SE of Ottawa, IL; nearest major city Joliet, IL)

LaSalle County Nuclear Sta.: Unit 1

BWR/GE

510 tons as of 1995.

Aug., 1982

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

41,000

Property Damage:

$118 Billion

Former owner: Commonwealth Edison Co.

Exelon Corporation

Illinois River

LaSalle County Nuclear Sta.: Unit 2

BWR/GE Type: Mark I

Apr., 1984

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

41,000

Property Damage:

$120 Billion

Exelon Corporation

Illinois River

Byron (17 miles SW of Rockford, IL (nearest major city))

Byron Station: Unit 1

PWR/W

444 tons as of 1995.

Sept. 16th, 1985

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

103,650

Property Damage:

$114 Billion

Hard-to miss: "[Their] twin cooling towers reach 495 feet into the air, overlooking the beautiful Rock River valley".  (Source: Exelon web site.)

Former owner: Commonwealth Edison Co.

Exelon Corporation

Rock River

Byron Station: Unit 2

1,120 Mw

PWR/W

Aug. 2nd, 1987

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

103,650

Property Damage:

$114 Billion

Exelon Corporation

Rock River

Braidwood (20 miles SSW of Joliet (nearest major city))

Braidwood: Unit 1

1,120 Mw

PWR/W

350 tons as of 1995.

July, 1988

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

84,250

Property Damage:

$127 Billion

Former owner: Commonwealth Edison Co.

Exelon Corporation

Kankakee River

Braidwood: Unit 2

1,120 Mw

 PWR/W

Oct., 1988

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

84,250

Property Damage:

$122 Billion

Exelon Corporation

Kankakee River

Clinton (6 miles E of Clinton, IL; nearest major city: Decatur, IL)

Clinton Nuclear Power Plant: Unit 1

933 / 950 Mw

BWR/GE

 191 tons as of 1995.

 

1987

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

46,600

Property Damage:

$93 Billion

"December 1999, Clinton Station was sold by Illinois Power to AmerGen, a joint venture of PECO (now Exelon) and British Energy, of Edinburgh, Scotland."  (Source: Exelon web site.)  At least one more Clinton unit was planned.

1997: 0% Capacity factor. (Source: ORNL 1999 NPP Analysis, Appendix E-3)

Exelon Corporation

Salt Creek

Metropolis

Honeywell Facility

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ohio:

Oak Harbor (21 miles ESE of Toledo, OH (nearest major city))

Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Sta.: Unit 1

906 Mw

PWR/ B&W

267 tons as of 1995; using ISFSI.

1977

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

84,400

Property Damage:

$84 Billion

March, 2002: Unnoticed leak of primary coolant causes a nearly complete melt-through of reactor vessel. (Source: Nuclear Information Resources Service.)

June 9th, 1985: Malfunction in the cooling system at Davis Besse (Source: Greenpeace.)

This reactor vessel (and many others) are susceptible to circular cracking.

H. Peter Burg is the Chairman and CEO, FirstEnergy Corp. (Source: Co. web site.)

One local paper is the Toledo Blade.

The local activists should contact: Jennifer O'Donnell, Ohio Citizen Action: www.ohiocitizen.org

At least two more units were planned.

FirstEnergy Corp.  Formerly owned by Toledo Edison Co.

Lake Erie

Perry (7 miles NE of Painesville, OH; nearest major city: Euclid, OH)

Perry Nuclear Power Plant: Unit 1

1,205 Mw

BWR/GE

195 tons as of 1995.

1986

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

199,500

Property Damage:

$102 Billion

Sept.4th, 1988: Fire at Perry (Source: Greenpeace.)

At least one more unit was planned.

First Energy Corp. (Formerly owned by Cleveland Electric Illuminating Co.)

Lake Erie

Piqua

Piqua Demonstration Reactor

11.4 Mw

OCR

 

Aug. 1962

CLOSED Jan. 1966

 

"SAFSTOR" Startup may be 1963 "OCR" = Organic Cooled and Moderated Reactor

 

Piketon

Portsmouth Gas Diffusion Plant

 

 

 

 

 

 

NORTHERN MID-WEST:

Michigan:

Big Rock Point, Charlevoix (228 miles NNW of Detroit, MI; 262 miles NNE of Chicago, IL (western extremity of south shore of Little Traverse Bay))

Big Rock Point Nuclear Plant

67 Mw

BWR/GE "world's first high-power-density [BWR]… cylindrical reactor weighed 120 tons, stood 30 feet tall, nine feet wide, and had steel walls five and a half inches thick.”  (Source: Consumers Energy web site.)

48 tons as of 1995.  Core consisted of 84 bundles of 117, 6-foot fuel rods each. -- more than 10 tons of “slightly” enriched uranium oxide pellets; (Source: Consumers Energy web site.)  Plans to use ISFSI.

Dec.8, 1962

Ran for 35 years ­longest of any US nuke.  (Source: Consumers Energy web site.)

CLOSED Aug.29th, 1997 “simply due to economics” (Source: Consumers Energy web site.)

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

20,380

Property Damage:

$? Billion

"DECON PREP.”

1997: 50.19% Capacity factor. (Source: ORNL 1999 NPP Analysis, Appendix E-3)

July 28th, 1990: Instrument failure at Big Rock Point. (Source: Greenpeace.)

“[Dry Cask Storage] involves placing the fuel in seven shielded, air-cooled, self-contained storage casks.  Spent fuel is sealed in a cask's internal steel canister; there are no pumps, valves or other moving parts. The design provides stability for the stored fuel, shielding from radiation and natural airflow around the outside of the sealed basket through air vents at the bottom and top of the cask. The vents allow heat removal from the basket wall through natural airflow, but the air does not come in direct contact with the stored fuel. After loading, the casks will be placed in a secure, fenced and monitored storage location on the plant site. Big Rock Point's casks are being designed and manufactured by the Westinghouse Corp.” Source: Consumers Energy web site.)

 

Consumers Energy

Lake Michigan

South Haven (5 miles S of South Haven, MI; nearest major city: Kalamazoo, MI)

Palisades Nuclear Power Station

688 / 800 Mw

PWR/CE

Reactor Vessel is made of steel.  (Source: Consumers Energy web site.)

 372 tons as of 1995; using ISFSI.

1971

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

18,000

Property Damage:

$53 Billion

Sept. 30th, 1990: Failure of reactor core cooling system at Palisades.  Source: Greenpeace.)

Palisades employees conduct monthly monitoring of the air, lake water, fish, crops and milk supplies in the surrounding area to test for radioactivity.” (Source: Consumers Energy web site.)

Palisades is a “full partner in Nuclear Management Company (NMC) of Hudson, Wisconsin” (Source: Consumers Energy web site.)

Consumers Energy

Lake Michigan

Newport, Monroe (25 miles NE of Toledo, OH; nearest major city: Detroit)

Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant: Unit 1

LMFBR

 

Aug. 1966

CLOSED Nov. 1972

 

"SAFSTOR" A scaled up EBR-1, it suffered a partial meltdown in 1966 in 3rd year of testing, closing it until 1970. (Source: The Nuclear Power Deception. p. 101).

Here’s exactly how it’s described at the Detroit Edison company web site’s history page: “The 1950s brought the dawn of the Atomic Age. Detroit Edison was involved with Dow Chemical in designing the world's first experimental liquid-metal cooled fast-breeder reactor - the Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant (Fermi 1). The company broke ground for Fermi 1 in 1956 and the nuclear plant operated from 1963-1966 and 1970-1972.”

 

 

Lake Erie

Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant: Unit 2

1,125 Mw

BWR/GE Type: Mark I

170 tons as of 1995.

1988

 Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

361,000

Property Damage:

$136 Billion

Detroit Edison Co.

Lake Erie

Bridgman, Berrien County (11 miles SSW of Benton Harbor, MI; nearest major city: South Bend, IN)

Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant: Unit 1

1,020 Mw

PWR/W

854 tons as of 1995. 

 

1974

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

94,900

Property Damage:

$92 Billion

ENVIRO-MICH: Internet List and Forum for Michigan Environmental and Conservation Issues and Michigan-based Citizen Action. Archives at http://www.great-lakes.net/lists/enviro-mich/

Sept. 1997 - ~3rd Qtr. 1999: Both units closed for “regulatory compliance” (Source: ORNL 1999 NPP Analysis, Appendix E-3)

June 25th, 1979: 4,000 litres of radioactive coolant water spray over upper level of containment building at DC Cook  (Source: Greenpeace; Unit unknown.)

American Electric Co.

#50-315

Lake Michigan

Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant: Unit 2

1,090 Mw

PWR/W

1974

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

103,000

Property Damage:

$101 Billion

American Electric Co.

#50-316

Lake Michigan

 

Minnesota:

Monticello (30 miles NW of Minneapolis, MN (nearest major city))

Monticello Nuclear Generating Plant

545 Mw

BWR/GE Type: Mark I

 161 tons as of 1995.

1970

Who knows if the Primary Containment works anyway?

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

14,500

Property Damage:

$45 Billion

30-year safety violation warrants fine of $100,000,000,000.00! One local newspaper that should cover this plant is the Star Tribune in Minneapolis.

Xcel Energy Corp. (Formerly owned by: Northern States Power Co.)

Mississippi River

Red Wing (28 miles SE of Minneapolis, MN (nearest major city))

Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant: #1

530 Mw

PWR/W

570 tons as of 1995; using ISFSI.

1974

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

10,000

Property Damage:

$48 Billion

Wayne H. Brunetti is the President and CEO of Xcel Energy Inc..  He holds a BS in Business Administration from the Univ. of FL. and is a graduate of the Harvard Business School’s Program for Management Development. Helped to form the Nuclear Management Corp. (NMC) to, streamline licensing and management of nuclear plants. (Source: Wall Street Journal.)

Xcel Energy Corp. (Formerly owned by: Northern States Power Co.)

Mississippi River

Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant: #2

530 Mw

PWR/W

1974

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

10,000

Property Damage:

$50 Billion

See Unit 1 for ownership information.

Mississippi River

Elk River

Elk River Demonstration Reactor

22 Mw

BWR

 

Nov. 1964

CLOSED Feb. 1968

 

"Dismantled"

 

 

Wisconsin:

La Crosse (Genoa; 15 miles SSE of LaCrosse, WI; 90 miles NW of Madison, WI)

La Crosse Nuclear Generating Sta.

48 Mw

BWR/AC

 

Nov. 1969

CLOSED April 1987

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

670

Property Damage:

$160 Billion

 

Dairyland Power Cooperative

Two Creeks (15 miles NNW of Manitowoc, WI; nearest major city: Green Bay, WI)

Point Beach Nuclear Plant: Unit 1

497 Mw

PWR/W

580 tons as of 1995; using ISFSI.

 

1970

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

16,500

Property Damage:

$41 Billion

Second-longest running reactor in the U.S. in terms of hours of operation.  (Source: Exelon web site.)

May 28th, 1996: Explosion during a welding procedure at the Point Beach. (Source: Greenpeace; Unit unknown.)

Wisconsin Michigan Power Co.

Lake Michigan

Point Beach Nuclear Plant: Unit 2

485 Mw PWR/W

Two-loop closed cycle unit with two steam generators.

1973

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

16,500

Property Damage:

$44 Billion

Wisconsin Michigan Power Co.

Lake Michigan

Carlton (27 miles SE of Green Bay, WI (nearest major city))

Kewaunee Nuclear Power Plant: Unit 1

535 Mw

PWR/W

310 tons as of 1995.

1973

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

25,900

Property Damage:

$47 Billion

Erroll Davis is the President, Chair and CEO of Alliant Energy.  Approx. 15% of Alliant’s electric power comes from nuclear. (Source: Alliant web site.)

The Kewaunee plant has two steam generators. Each stands 68 feet high. They are 20 feet in diameter and weigh about 400 tons each. (Source: http://www.wonuc.org/lien/wusa.html )

Alliant Energy / Wisconsin Power & Light (formerly owned by Wisconsin Public Service Corp.; Wisconsin Michigan Power Co.)

Lake Michigan

 

South Dakota:

Sioux Falls

Pathfinder Atomic Plant

66 Mw

BWR

 

July 1964

CLOSED Oct. 1967

 

"Converted".

 

MID-WEST:

Iowa:

Palo (8 miles NW of Cedar Rapids, IA)

Duane Arnold Energy Center: Unit 1

538 Mw

BWR/GE Type: Mark I

283 tons as of 1995; plans to use ISFSI.

1974

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

14,900+

Property Damage:

$54 Billion

June 17th, 1992: Fire at Arnold (Source: Greenpeace.)

This plant might now be owned by Alliant Energy.

Iowa Electric Light & Power Co, Central Iowa Power Cooperative

Cedar River

 

Kansas:

Burlington (4 miles NE of Burlington, KS; nearest major city: Topeka, KS)

Wolf Creek Generating Sta.: Unit 1

1,150 Mw

PWR/W (" four-loop")

249 tons as of 1995.

1985

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

7,000

Property Damage:

$105 Billion

Animation of how it works: http://www.wcnoc.com/howwcworks.cfm Approx. 300 acres of buildings.  (Source: Wolf Creek web site.)

Supposed to be an identical twin to the Callaway plant in Missouri, but apparently not (see Callaway for details). (Source: Union of Concerned Scientists.)

Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corp., (original owner: Kansas City Power & Light Co.)

Wolf Creek

 

Missouri:

Fulton, Callaway County (10 miles SE of Fulton; 25 miles NE of Jefferson City; 100 miles W of St. Louis)

Callaway Plant: Unit 1

1,143 Mw

PWR/W SNUPPS (Standardized Nuclear Power Plant System, a Westinghouse four-loop reactor.)

308 tons as of 1995

Dec., 1984

 

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

53,100

Property Damage:

$110 Billion

Dec., 2001: One of three coolant pumps fails when part of a condensate storage tank cover falls in the tank and subsequently blocks flow. Problem took over a month to show up in part because one worker who knew said nothing. (Source: Columbia (MO) Daily Tribune)

Aug., 1999: Cooling-water drain line breaks from severe corrosion forcing a reactor shutdown.  Subsequent inspections revealed at least 10 areas where pipes had decayed and were in danger of breaking. (Source: OC Register.)

Although Callaway is supposed to be an identical twin of the Wolf Creek reactor, some events at Callaway are reported to be 10 to 20 times more likely to lead to reactor core damage than the same events at Wolf Creek.  (Source: UCS Nuclear Plant Risk Studies report, 2000)

A second Callaway unit was planned.

The total cost was $3 Billion (Source: Company web site.)

Ameren Corporation (Formerly owned by Union Electric Co.)

 

Nebraska:

Fort Calhoun (19 miles N of Omaha, NB (nearest major city))

Ft. Calhoun Station: Unit 1

475 Mw

PWR/CE

244 tons as of 1995.

1973

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

38,000

Property Damage:

$43 Billion

May 31st, 1992: Engineering accident at Fort Calhoun (Source: Greenpeace.)

A second Ft. Calhoun unit was planned.

Omaha Public Power District, Nebraska Public Power District

Missouri River

Brownville (23 miles S of Nebraska City, NE; nearest major city: Lincoln)

Cooper Nuclear Station

778 Mw

BWR/GE Type: Mark I

 192 tons as of 1995.

1974

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

7,400

Property Damage:

$57 Billion

June, 2001: Electrical fire burns for more than a quarter of an hour, causes plant to go on “alert”; one reactor recirculation pump shuts down.  Potential to affect safety equipment admitted.  Backup power to the plant’s emergency response center did not fully kick in, and the plant missed several deadlines including notification of local authorities. (Source: Omaha (NE) World-Herald, Dec. 19th, 2001)

Aug. 8th, 1990: Steam valve failure at Cooper (Source: Greenpeace.)

Nebraska Public Power District, Omaha Public Power District

Missouri River

Hallam

Hallam Nuclear Power Facility, Sheldon Sta.

75 Mw

LMGMR

 

Nov. 1963

CLOSED Sept. 1966

 

"Entombed" Start may have been 1962, shutdown may have been 1964. Sodium Graphite. (Sources include: The Electric War)

 

 

Texas:

Glen Rose (4 miles N of Glen Rose, TX; nearest major city: Ft. Worth, TX)

Comanche Peak Steam Electric Sta.: Unit 1

1,150 Mw

PWR/W

193 tons as of 1995.

 

1990

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

20,000

Property Damage:

$117 Billion

 

Texas Utilities Co.

Squaw Creek Reservoir

Comanche Peak Steam Electric Sta.: Unit 2

1,111 Mw

PWR/W

1993

  

 

 

Texas Utilities Co.

Squaw Creek Reservoir

Matagorda County (nearest major city: Galveston, TX; 90 miles SW of Houston, TX; 8 miles west of Wadsworth, TX, 12 miles SSW of Bay City, TX)

South Texas Project Electric Generating Sta.: Unit 1

1,250 Mw

PWR/W “pressurized to 2,300 pounds per square inch to keep water liquid at 600º F” (Source: STP web site.)

320 tons as of 1995.

Aug., 1988

 Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

39,000

Property Damage:

$112 Billion

STP Nuclear Operating Co. operates the plant for the owners: Austin Energy, The City of Austin, 16 percent; AEP-Central Power and Light Co., 25.2 percent; City Public Service of San Antonio, 28 percent; Reliant Energy HL&P, 30.8 percent (Source: STP web site.)

The Reactor Containment Buildings are 200-foot domes. The plant site is an official wildlife area providing habitat for several threatened species, including bald eagles, peregrine falcons, white-tailed hawks and alligators. (Source: STP web site.)

April 19th, 2003: "[A radioactive] powdery material was found April 12 on the outside of two instrument guide tubes where the tubes enter the bottom of the reactor". (Source: New York Times; Unit unknown.)

May 8th, 1990: Pipe crack in reactor at South Texas (Source: Greenpeace; Unit unknown.)

South Texas Project (Operator); owner: Reliant Energy HL&P (30.8%); San Antonio City Public Service Board; Central Power & Light; Austin Electric Dept.

Colorado River

South Texas Project Electric Generating Sta.: Unit 2

1,250 Mw

PWR/W (See Unit 1 for information.)

June, 1989

 Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

39,000

Property Damage:

$104 Billion

(See Unit 1 for ownership information.)

Colorado River

(13 miles NE of Amarillo, TX)

Pantex Plant

 

 

 

 

 

 

MOUNTAIN STATES & THE SOUTHWEST:

Arizona:

Wintersburg (36 miles W of Phoenix, AZ (nearest major city))

Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Sta.: Unit 1

1,270 Mw

PWR/CE

612 tons as of 1995. 

1985

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

55,000

Property Damage:

$90 Billion

Aug., 2001: Valve failure causes leak of radioactive cooling water from the irradiated fuel-cooling pool into the reactor containment building, forcing a reactor shutdown.  (Source: OC Register.)  March 14th, 1993: Hundred of liters of contaminated water gush from a leaking steam generator tube at Palo Verde (Source: Greenpeace; unit unknown).  May 14th, 1986 Power lines to the Palo Verde nuclear power plant sabotaged  (Source: Greenpeace; Unit unknown)

"The 11 billion kilowatt-hours that Unit 3 generated in 1999 ranked first among the nation’s 103 nuclear units and fifth among the world’s 435 units"  (Source: AZ PS Co. web site.)

The APS web site has virtually no information about its nuclear plants.

At least 2 more Palo Verde Units were planned.

AZ Public Service Co., Salt River Project, El Paso Electric, Southern California Edison, Public Service Co. of NM, Southern CA Public Power Authority, Los Angeles Dept. of Water & Power

Phoenix City Sewage Treatment Plant

Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Sta.: Unit 2

1,270 Mw

PWR/CE

1986

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

40,000+

Property Damage:

$? Billion

(See Unit 1 for ownership information.)

Phoenix City Sewage Treatment Plant

Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Sta.: Unit 3

1,270 Mw

PWR/CE

1987

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

40,000+

Property Damage:

$? Billion

(See Unit 1 for ownership information.)

Phoenix City Sewage Treatment Plant

 

Colorado:

Platteville, Weld County (4 miles NW of Platteville, CO; “in the shadow of the Rockies”)

Fort Saint Vrain Nuclear Generating Sta.

330 Mw

HTGR/ GA Helium at a pressure of about 700 psia circulated around the core heats a secondary system at 2,400 psig and 1,000° F (Source: C.H.Fuller, IAEA web site.)

Core was made of 1,482 hexagonal fuel elements consisting of a graphite block loaded with triso-coated uranium and thorium particles bonded into cylindrical rods. (Source: C. H. Fuller report, IAEA.)

Fueling began Dec. 27th, 1973. First commercial power production was Dec, 1976.

First announced in March, 1965. Construction began in April, 1968.  (Source: fsv.homestead.com )

 CLOSED Aug. 1989 (prematurely): “Nuclear operations came to a close in 1989 due to continued problems with the plant.  Decommissioning of the reactor as well as shipping of all nuclear fuel off-site to a U.S. Department of Energy managed facility was complete in 1992.” (Source: fsv.homestead.com )

 

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

7,000

Property Damage:

$39 Billion

"Converted" (now a gas plant and wind farm).

Fort St. Vrain was “the only high temperature gas-cooled (HTGR) power reactor in the United States. The plant [featured] a helium-cooled reactor with a uranium-thorium fuel cycle.” (Source: International Atomic Energy Agency web site.)

Wishful thinking: “The operational history of Fort St. Vrain can be characterized by low availability and inconsistent production. … The circulators … experienced failures in bolting due to chloride stress corrosion cracking… three of the top ten months of operation for Fort St. Vrain have been achieved in 1988… The continued operation of Fort St. Vrain will further enhance the MHTGR concept.”  (Source: IAEA paper by C. H. Fuller of PSCC.)

Typical problem: “On Feb. 22nd [1982] the reactor was manually scrammed due to high moisture and two control rods failed to scram.  Three additional rods exhibited a tendency to stick in the full-out position.” (Source: fsv.homestead.com )  Photos.

Public Service Company of Colorado

(5 miles SE of Boulder, CO)

Rocky Flats Plant

 

 

 

 

 

 

PACIFIC & NORTHWEST:

Idaho:

 

EBR-1

 

 

1951

CLOSED

 

There was a partial meltdown in Nov. 1955. during a test (source: The Nuclear Power Deception, p. 100)

 

Idaho Falls

Light Water Reactor

BWR

 

 

CLOSED

 

U.S. Army reactor. Supercriticality accident in 1961 killed 3 operators.

 

Idaho Falls (49 miles W of Idaho Falls, ID)

Idaho National Engineering Lab

 

 

 

 

 

Other Idaho reactors at the INEL: BORAX, EBR II, and LOFT, and others (all closed). Also Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) which still operates.

 

 

Nevada:

Tonopah (60 miles NW of Las Vegas, NV)

Nevada Test Site / Tonopah Test Range

 

 

 

 

 

Boom!
Contact the Shundahai Network:
www.shundahai.org
shundahai@shundahai.org

 

 

New Mexico:

Los Alamos (1 mile S of Los Alamos, NM)

Los Alamos Labs

 

 

 

 

 

Fire in 1990s spread radiation across the nation.

 

 

Oregon:

Prescot (nearest major city: Portland, OR)

Trojan Nuclear Plant: Unit 1

1,130 Mw

PWR/W

 397 tons; all fuel was placed in on-site pools in 1993.

May 1976

CLOSED Nov. 1992 (prematurely)

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

20,000

Property Damage:

$90 Billion

"DECON".

Permanently closed January, 1993 “for a variety of reasons, including potentially high operating costs, defective steam generators, and energy market conditions.” (Source: Washington State Dept. of Health Fact Sheet.)

Portland General Electric Co.

Columbia River

 

Washington:

Richland (Hanford Reservation) (12 miles NW of Richland, WA)

N-Reactor/WPPSS Steam

860-800 Mw

GRAPH-ITE /AEC

 

1966

 

 

 

ERDA

WPPSS No. 1

1,250 Mw

PWR/ B&W

267 tons as of 1995.  Columbia Gen. Sta. intends to start using Dry Cask storage in 2004. Energy Northwest has transferred approximately 488,151 pounds of UF6 and 263,137 SWU of Columbia uranium to the General Electric Co. (Source: Energy Northwest’s web site.)

 

 

 

“Placed on extended construction delay status in 1982, when it was 65% complete” 

“Terminated.”

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

24,200

Property Damage:

$80 Billion

WPPSS is commonly pronounced whoops; the project involved the largest utility bond default in history (Source: The Nuclear Power Deception, p.104)

The Chief Executive Officer of Energy Northwest is J. Vic Parrish.  Energy Northwest is a municipal corporation and joint operating agency of the State of Washington.

Aug. 15th, 1992: Accidental oscillation of reactor core at Hanford (Source: Greenpeace; Unit unknown.)

Energy Northwest

Columbia River

Columbia Generating Station (originally known as WPPSS No. 2)

1,153 Mw

 BWR/GE

1984

 Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

21,300

Property Damage:

$78 Billion

Energy Northwest

Columbia River

Satsop

WPPSS No. 3

1,240 Mw

PWR/CE

“Placed on extended construction delay status in 1983, when it was 75% complete” 

“Terminated.”

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

17,973

Property Damage:

$74 Billion

Energy Northwest

Columbia River

Richland (Hanford Reservation)

WPPSS No. 4

1,250 Mw

PWR/ B&W

Not funded (yet?)

 

 

Wash. Public Power Supply System

Columbia River

Satsop

WPPSS No. 5

1,240 Mw

PWR/CE

Not funded (yet?)

 

 

Wash. Public Power Supply System

(13 miles NW of Richland, WA)

Hanford Site

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yakima

Fast Flux Text Facility

400 Mw

Breeder Reactor

Fuel has been removed.

 

Idled 19922001: FFTF to be closed permanently.

 

The Energy department’s newest reactor, it was an experimental unit.

Department of Energy

 

California:

Eureka / Humboldt Bay (4 miles SW of Eureka, CA)

Humboldt Bay Power Plant: Unit 3

63 Mw

BWR/GE

 32 tons.

Aug. 1963

CLOSED 1980

 

"DECON"

Pacific Gas & Electric Co. (PG&E)

Humboldt Bay / Pacific Ocean

San Clemente, Orange County (4 miles SE of San Clemente, CA; nearest major city: Oceanside, CA)

San Onofre Nuclear Generating Sta.: Unit 1

436 Mw

PWR/W

794 tons as of 1995.

 

1967

CLOSED Nov. 1992

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

24,000

Property Damage:

$59 Billion

"DECON" (Decommissioning).  Once considered a demonstration plant for PWRs,  Unit 1 was closed prematurely due to the costs of required seismic retrofitting.  1981: 700 cubic yards of radioactive sand discovered, apparently contaminated by water that leaked from Unit 1’s cooling system. 1980: Steam Generator is badly dented and leaking.  Edison “brings in 600 workers to patch 7,000 faults in the radioactive steam tubes.  Edison is later fined $100,000 for allowing 66 workers to become exposed to dangerous amounts of radiation.”  (Sources: OC Register.)

(See Unit 2 for ownership information.)

Pacific Ocean

San Onofre Nuclear Generating Sta.: Unit 2

1,100 Mw

PWR/CE

1982

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

68,000

Property Damage:

$186 Billion

Visit the webmaster's SHUT SAN ONOFRE web site. The San Diego Union-Tribune, the North County (CA) Times, the Orange County Register, and the Los Angeles Times (Orange County Edition) are the local papers which should cover these plants.

Jan. 9th, 2002:  Ex-maintenance worker, fired after 17 years at the plant in Dec. 2001, threatens employees and the plant ­ a search of his property reveals over 200 assault rifles, grenades, rocket launchers, tear gas, and over 5000 rounds of ammo.  (Source: Numerous news media.) Feb. 3rd, 2001:  20-year old circuit breaker fails to close, creating a 4,000-volt arc and fire that cuts power to coolant control systems, drowned emergency switching valves and shuts down emergency oil pumps, destroying Unit 3 generator shaft.  “Currently (Dec., 2001), 150 identical breakers remain in service at the plant.” (Source: OC Register.)

The University of California, Irvine, CA, holds the public documents for the three San Onofre plants.

The Vice President of Nuclear at SCE, San Onofre Nuclear Plant, is Mr. Joseph Wambold.  He claims the OC Register has an “obsession” with “worst-case disaster scenarios” (12-23-01).  He also claims the Feb 3rd, 2001 fire “was not the result of aging equipment”. He did not provide another explanation.

Southern California Edison (SCE); San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E); Anaheim Public Utilities Dept.; Riverside Utilities Dept.

#50-361

Pacific Ocean

San Onofre Nuclear Generating Sta.: Unit 3

1,100 Mw

PWR/CE

1983

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

68,000

Property Damage:

$182 Billion

(See Unit 2 for ownership information.)

#50-362

Pacific Ocean

Diablo Cyn / Avila Beach (nearest major city: Santa Barbara; 12 miles WSW of San Luis Obispo, CA)

Diablo Cyn Nuclear Power Plant: Unit 1

1,084 Mw

PWR/W

509 tons as of 1995.

1984

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

33,000

Property Damage:

$155 Billion

Contact Molly Johnson - SLO CO Grandmothers for Peace 6290 Hawk Ridge Place, San Miguel, CA 93451 805/467-2431

May, 2000: A failed electrical conductor triggers a fire that cuts power to the coolant and circulating water pumps that keep the nuclear core from overheating. (Source: OC Register)

Pacific Gas & Electric Co. (PG&E)

#50-275

Pacific Ocean

Diablo Cyn Nuclear Power Plant: Unit 2

1,106 Mw

PWR/W

1985

Making waste

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

34,000

Property Damage:

$158 Billion

Pacific Gas & Electric Co. (PG&E)

#50-323

Pacific Ocean

Clay Station, Herald (25 miles SE of Sacramento, CA (nearest major city); 26 miles NNE of Stockton, CA)

Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Sta.

913 Mw

PWR/ B&W

250 tons -- scheduled to be moved in 2002.

1974

CLOSED June 1989 (prematurely)

1982 CRAC-2 est.

“Worst Case” Casualties:

70,000

Property Damage:

$113 Billion

"Decon".

Rancho Seco is the only nuclear power plant in the U.S. which was closed by popular referendum.  Later polls suggest voters’ mainly concerned about management, not radiation.  (Source: NY Times, Dec. 27th, 2001.)

Dec. 26th, 1985: Accidental reactor shutdown due to technical failure at Rancho Seco. Mar. 20th, 1977: Accidental temperature increase at Rancho Seco (Sources: Greenpeace.)

Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD)

Folsom Canal

Santa Susana

Sodium Reactor Experiment

10 Mw

SCGR

 

Apr. 1957

CLOSED Sept. 1964

 

"Dismantled"

 

 

Livermore Site 300 (9 miles E of Livermore, CA)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Livermore National Labs (2 miles E of Livermore, CA)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sandia National Labs (Livermore, CA)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vallecitos (7 miles SW of Pleasanton, CA)

 

GE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 3rd, 1960: Melting of fuel elements cause a release of radioactivity at the Test Reactor at Waltz Mills (Source: Greenpeace.)

Learn about the effects of nuclear weapons here:
http://www.animatedsoftware.com/environm/no_nukes/tenw/nuke_war.htm

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